The Bride To Be

John Talbot’s presentation of the Book of Shrewsbury to Queen Margaret of Anjou ca 1445 AD. Public domain, courtesy of the British Library Royal.
John Talbot’s presentation of the Book of Shrewsbury to Queen Margaret of Anjou ca 1445 AD. Public domain, courtesy of the British Library Royal.

So Flash! Friday forced me to tread that genre that, I sadly must admit dear reader, leaves me bereft of imagination, Romance. I blame the years spent watching my mother devour Mills & Boon tomes, the cover always replete with a maiden swooning over some gent of nobility or other. Anyway, as I get repeatedly assured, it’s good to push oneself creatively, so pen in hand I sat down to drawn inspiration from the photo prompt above and the theme of a wedding.

The result, well you can decide for yourself, (it got a mention by the judges so I’ll post that under!)

hope you enjoy (fingers crossed)

The Bride To Be

Luxurious fabrics and fragrant rose petals caressed Isabella’s skin. Today had been a triumph, thousands gathering to witness their union, the bells pealing across the realm, a feast of exotic wonders.

At the ceremony she had stood beside her true love, heart fluttering. She had never looked so beautiful, her dress accentuating every curve. Even the King had noticed, whispering lustful comments as they knelt in front of the Cardinal.

Isabella was prepared to surrender herself, becoming a queen through his conquest. Comforted that the goblet of wine, thrust into his hand as he ascended the stairs, was laced with something slow acting and untraceable.

He would be dead in the morning, a heart attack the doctors would declare.

The nation would mourn and Isabella would vow to honour her departed king by never taking another man again.

Thankfully her true love wasn’t.

She just knew that the reign of Isabella and Beatrix was going to be a joyous one.

 

Judges Comment

This wasn’t the only same-sex marriage entry this week, all of which were a fun surprise, but I loved the lines, “At the ceremony she had stood beside her true love, heart fluttering,” which of course we assume to mean her bridegroom. Then we get, “She had never looked so beautiful, her dress accentuating every curve,” because at first we think it’s describing Isabella, only to, at the end, learn Isabella was describing Beatrix.”

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